Last Week’s Instagram

Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week. It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Canon Eos-5D with a 24-105 mm lens set at 35 mm. The photo was transferred to my cell phone and processed first with the Snapseed app with various adjustments before uploaded in Instagram.

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Posted in Photo Books, Photography | Tagged , | 21 Comments

Good Start of the Picture Critique

© Mary Hone

© Linda Grashoff

© Elaine

© Holly Hunter

© Mary Shoobridge

© Terry

© Linda Paul

© Monica Amberger

The first week of my latest run of photo critique was inspiring. I received a handful and more captivating images from bloggers who trusted me to give some useful and constructive feedback. For me that is always a humbling experience, whether I am granted the chance to provide feedback here on this site or during my regular workshops. It requires respect and understanding of each photograph’s level to be able to not only praise their photos but also honestly point to possible improvements, without discouraging the recipients.

Many years of teaching workshops have given me confidence in the process, and at this stage I am sorely enjoying both looking at for me new bodies of work and articulate what I see and feel when taking in their artistic expressions. It’s inspirational for me, as well as something I always learn from myself. Of course, when giving my feedback, I don’t claim to know what is right or wrong, but I still hope my opinion will make some sense for those who trust me with their photos. However, it’s only my opinion, and others my see things quite differently and even in opposition to my views. So, for those of you who let me give my feedback, take whatever makes sense to you of what I write and then leave the rest behind.

This first week, only bloggers who already know me through exchange and blogging over the internet have submitted photos to this round of critique. I hope over the next little period that others would like to give it a try as well. So if you have a photo you would like some feedback on, please don’t hesitate to submit a link to my page here, called Picture Critique. Remember, it’s not about submitting excellent photos, but about photos you feel uncertain about or photos you would like to get an outsider’s opinion about.

Keep in mind that I will only keep this possibility for picture critique open another couple of weeks. By the end of the month, I will close the site. If you have a photo—or think you have one—jump on and grab the opportunity; submit a photo, or more correctly submit a link to the photo. I will get back with my honest, sincere and constructive feedback as soon as possible after you have submitted the link. Take a look on the page and get an idea how it works. And then welcome with your photo.

Let me finally add that if you need some ideas to improve your photography I would like to recommend my eBook 10 Great Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Point-and-Shoot Camera. It’s an inexpensive eBook full of inspiration, and it’s available on my website http://www.munchow.no.

Posted in Photography | Tagged | 35 Comments

Last Week’s Instagram

Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week. It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Canon Eos-5D with a 16-35 mm lens set at 27 mm. The photo was transferred to my cell phone and processed first with the Snapseed app with various adjustments before uploaded in Instagram.

Posted in Personal Work, Photography | Tagged , | 55 Comments

Get Feedback on a Photo of Yours

Do you have a photo you need feedback on, a picture you are unsure about, a picture that is different from your usual style or just a picture that you want to know how to do better? I have once again opened up for my popular picture critique. Post a picture on my Picture Critique page here on this blog and get my feedback on the photo.

It’s been a while since last time (as a matter of fact summer 2015). But here I am with another round of picture critique! So once again, I open up for submission of photos anyone would like some feedback on. This is the fifth time I do this, and the previous rounds were well received by those who sent me their photos.

As last time my idea is to let any of you who have pictures you want to have some feedback on to post them on my site here. Go to the Picture Critique page, post a link to the picture and I will soon give my honest view and perception of your picture in what I attempt to be constructive and meaningful critique.

I both teach and attend a lot of workshops, and one of the greatest values from participating in photographic workshops is the possibility to have feedback on pictures you take. I know from the workshops I teach that this is what students appreciate the most. Therefore, here is a chance to get feedback on your pictures without having to participate in an expensive workshop. Not quite the same of course, but I hope it can be of some value.

If you are interested, go to the Picture Critique page to read more or just post a picture there. I hope to see your picture soon. Please do not post any picture or links to pictures here, but go to the Picture Critique page.

Beneath are a collage of the pictures submitted in the last round of picture critique. Are you ready for – or need – some feedback on one of your photos? Here is the chance.

Posted in Creativity, Photo Workshop, Photography | Tagged | 33 Comments

Last Week’s Instagram

Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week. It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Panasonic Lumix LX-100 with the lens set at 32,6 mm (the equivalent of a 72 mm lens for a fullformat camera). The photo was transferred to my cell phone and processed first with the Snapseed app with various adjustments before uploaded in Instagram.

Posted in Personal Work, Photography | Tagged , , | 57 Comments

Slow Down

One of the curses of digital photography is that it’s so easy. It’s so easy to shoot anything and everywhere. We end up shooting too fast and too much. In photography fast is not always better. We may do better by slowing down, be more deliberate in our approach.

In the days of analogue film, it cost somewhere around 25 cents for each click. That cost would make expenses rise quickly if you weren’t careful. It motivated photographers to learn their craft and to focus, concentrate, and compose in a more mindful way. Back then, you couldn’t just hold down the shutter and hope, not even on assignment with a comfortable budget.

Pushing a button is easy, but crafting a good photograph is hard. Lake paddling across the sea, it takes consistent work. If you have a long way to paddle you will quickly tire out if you go out too fast. In the long run slow is fast. The same in photography. If you want to create lasting images, don’t just shoot anything and everywhere. Don’t just hold down the shutter button. Rather be mindful and slow. As Chris Owen, photographer, teacher and best-selling author, says: “In the era of instant, it’s the permanent that stands out from the crowd.”

By slowing down you may actually accomplish more. Creating photographs that stand the test of time isn’t an easy thing to do. And I believe most people can’t make images that last, because they are moving too fast. We worry about moments missed, and we take pictures in a furious pace. In photo circles it’s called “spray and pray”—that is to say holding down the shutter and hope.

I notice it in myself particularly when I do street photography. In the beginning of a session, I run around searching for something, anything that is worth capturing. I am afraid I might miss a moment, I believe maybe around the corner is a better vantage point with more activity on the street. I end up shooting a lot of photos, but nothing worth keeping. It’s when I take a deep breath, slow down and decide to stay in one place, wait and let things happen in their own time and pace, that I slowly start to get images that might be worth keeping.

Making good photos requires effort from us. So we shoot a lot of photos to make up for our lack of skill. However, just because you can shoot a lot doesn’t mean you should. But we still do. Why? Because less takes more time. We don’t have—or don’t take—the time to take better photographs, so we end up settling for good or even inferior. We work quickly and hope for the best.

Creating photographs that last means, we need to change our pace. Even Ansel Adams used to say, “twelve significant photographs in a year is a good crop.” When you slow down and lower your expected output, you can become an artisan in your craft. The constrains of a slower pace beckons you to photograph in a more thoughtful way.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken a Fujifilm X10 with the lens set at 20 mm (the equivalent of a 80 mm for a full frame camera). Shutter speed: 1/800 s. Aperture: f/7,1. The photo was processed in Lightroom and Photoshop.

Do you need some ideas to improve your photography and not having to spend a lot of money on new equipment? My eBook 10 Great Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Point-and-Shoot Camera might be what you are looking for. It’s an inexpensive eBook full of inspiration, and it’s available on my website http://www.munchow.no.

Posted in Photographic Reflections, Photography | Tagged , , | 87 Comments

Last Week’s Instagram

Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week. It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Panasonic Lumix LX-100 with the lens set at 10,9 mm (the equivalent of a 24 mm lens for a fullformat camera). The photo was transferred to my cell phone and processed first with the Snapseed app with various adjustments before uploaded in Instagram.

Posted in Creativity, Personal Work, Photography, Travel Photography | Tagged , | 31 Comments