Last Week’s Instagram

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Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week (this photo is actually more than a week old, but I haven’t posted any new material the last week). It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Panasonic Lumix LX-100 with the lens set at 34 mm (the equivalent of a 75 mm for a full frame camera). Shutter speed: 1/125 of a second. Aperture: f/2.8. The photo was transferred to my cell phone and then processed with the Snapseed app with the Drama filter.

Posted in Personal Work, Photography | Tagged , | 19 Comments

Pay Attention

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I think all creatives yearn for some kind of success, some kind of recognition for the work we do. Success is maybe not why we photograph, write, paint or travel—or whatever creative activity we do—or ought not to be. The work itself, being creative, is a reward good enough if we only let ourselves not get obsessed with the thought of success. The craving for success can actually get in the way of our creative endeavour.

Nevertheless, we do feel good when we experience some kind of success, whether it’s monetary gain or just some heartfelt feedback from a good friend. I am sure you know what I am talking about.

Success is all in our minds, though. You cannot control how the world will receive and perceive your artistic work, but you can be in command of how you feel about it yourself. If you let yourself feel good about actually having achieve your creative goal, whether it’s a book you have written or a photo project you have undertaken, your creativity may flourish even more.

I know, it’s easy to say. Because we do yearn for some kind of recognition from the outside. And when it doesn’t come —and often it doesn’t or takes a long time to arrive—we feel discouraged or even dumped. What really happens then is we fire up under our own scepticism.

Perhaps the greatest barrier for a creative life is this deeply held scepticism that we all hold inside of us. When we don’t experience the success we so want, we nourish our own scepticism. Then we start to doubt. We doubt our creative abilities. We doubt we have it in us at all, and these doubts are very powerful.

Very often when success doesn’t show up, we give up, let our creative self down. Instead, we let ourselves sink into addictive thoughts. Rather than living now, we spin our wheels and indulge in daydreams of could have, would have, should have. We stop being creative, even resent it and fall into a black hole. Life is no longer what it is, but what it could be or ought to be. According to Julia Cameron, a writer, director and producer—and the author of the book The Artist’s Way—one of the greatest misconceptions about artistic life is that it entails great swathes of aimlessness. The truth, according to her, is that a creative life involves great swathes of attention. Attention is a way to connect and survive.

So when you feel miserable and futile because success has failed to appear, instead of letting yourself sink into despair and resignation, start to pay attention to what is beautiful in your life. Try not to worry about your creative disappointment, be aware of the now. Live in the now. You still have creativity in you; you are still creative, no matter success or failure. Success or failure has little to do with quality of life—creatively or otherwise. Again, according to Julia Cameron, quality of life is in proportion, always, to the capacity to delight. If you are able to feel delight even when life is hard, success doesn’t show up or when you lose someone you love, you can recover and feel alive again. If you are able to feel delight, you will gain trust in your creative abilities again. You will start to create again.

And here is the point: The capacity for delight is the gift of paying attention. If you pay attention to what is right now, the small pleasure that always are, you are on a path to creative recovery.

The award of attention is always healing. It begins as the healing of a particular pain—the lost lover, the sickly child, the shattered dream, the lack of success. But what is healed, finally, is the pain that underlies all pains; the pain that we are all, as Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist Rainer Maria Rilke phrases it, «unutterably alone». Attention gets us back on the track, and what more is attention is an act of connection. This I know from my own experience.

Some 15 years ago, I went through a divorce. As anyone who has undergone a divorce knows, it’s a painful experience. After my divorce, I pretty much withdrew from everything. I stopped seeing friends, I didn’t go out anymore, I didn’t engage in anything besides work and spending as much time with my kids as possible. In reality I gave up myself, I felt ashamed and I felt guilty. Eventually my creativity—that my work so depends on—stagnated as well.

I would take long, solitary walks, and I would suffer. Then one day, as I was doing a day hike up in the mountains surrounding the city I live in and was immersed in my own ominous thoughts, a little girl ran into me. She had been chasing a butterfly and hadn’t seen me at all, before she bumped into me. «Isn’t that a beautiful butterfly», I remember her saying. In fact, it was a rather dull, bleak butterfly, but suddenly I did see its delicate beauty. And then I started to notice the small flowers that grew out around rocks, I noticed birds in the sky and saw the imaginative figures the clouds formed on the sky above. It was as if I suddenly was awakened. I started to pay attention. I started to live in the now again. I started to appreciated what was.

Not long after my life got traction again—included my creative life.

The poet William Meredith has observed that the worst that can be said of a man is that «he did not pay attention».

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken on Ilford XP-2 film with a Canon EOS-3 and a 16-35 mm lens set at 20 mm. The photo was scanned and processed in Photoshop.

Posted in Creativity, Photography | Tagged , | 99 Comments

Last Week’s Instagram

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Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week (this photo is actually more than a week old, but I haven’t posted any new material the last week). It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Canon EOS-5D with a 24-105 lens set at 85 mm. Shutter speed: 1/320 of a second. Aperture: f/22. The photo was transferred to my cell phone and then processed with the Snapseed app.

Posted in Personal Work, Photography | Tagged , | 33 Comments

Natural Light Indoor

Nothing beats natural light. It’s versatile, always changing like a facet, thus always surprising and so beautiful. Even in places, you recon you would need to use artificial light; you may take advantage of natural light. Think indoor. Your first thought may be to turn on the flash, but instead of its harsh and contrasting result, here is a different approach.

If you are interested in this practical tip, you will find more about it on Blue Hour Photo Workshop’s blog.

Posted in Creativity, Photo Techniques, Photography, Practical Tips | Tagged , , | 33 Comments

Some Things Never Change

Det danses tango på Prado

In my post A Delicate Balance last week, I wrote about the dialectic process that photography is. On one hand, you have the technical foundation, that a photograph comes into being by technical means; and on the other hand, that for a photo to capture its audience it needs to hold some emotional content. I also stated that the later is the more important factor. As I wrote, an emotionally loaded but technically poor photo trumps a technically perfect photo lacking emotional content—any time.

What I find interesting is that today it seems like it’s easier than ever to take photos. Present days cameras have become so advanced and at the same time so easy to handle, that everybody can make a technical well capture photograph without knowing much about the technical part of photography at all.

I want to underscore that I just wrote that it seems easier than ever. Because it still isn’t easier to capture the emotional content—and not even technically is it easier, really, with respect to using technique to emphasize a photograph’s content and story. Yes, it is easier to get a perfectly exposed and focused photo, but technique is not only about this. Technique has a far more important role to play—at least if you take your photography serious. You want to understand how you can use for instance shutter speed and aperture visually and how they impact the visual language to substantiate the story you are trying to tell.

The reality is that taking photos that both engage and capture the essence of a moment requires more than just having a advance and intelligent camera—no matter how much of a technical wonder it is. As much as any camera today operates stunningly well under most conditions—and their capabilities keep improving every year, they cannot make the decisions that result in great photos. Only you can. No automatic setting can determine how you want to frame your subject. No automatic camera can decide the best moment to press the shutter button. No camera can choose what you want to photograph. Only you can.

Photography is a skill and a craft. Yes, the technological development has, on some levels, made it easier than ever to take photos. But if you desire more than just perfectly focused and exposed photos—which, by the way, is not guaranteed in and of itself even with today’s cameras—you still need to learn the craft. The camera cannot think for you or distinguish between a terrible photo, an ordinary photo or the masterpiece. You still have to take command of the photographic moment and the camera—whether it is a cell phone, a point-and-shoot camera or an advanced DSLR you use.

Two very important factors that has a huge impact on the visual expression of photography is complete independent on the camera you use and how advanced—or not—it is. The fact is, these two factors are all yours to decide and this has not changed a bit since photography was invented in 1826 when Nicéphore Niépce captured the first ever photograph.

Your choice of space and time when you take a photo will always be independent on the camera and camera technique. If you want to take photos that respond with an audience, you will need to learn how to use both space and time to capture those telling images. In many ways, this is the classical time-space continuum. This space-time continuum is a mathematical and physical model that combines space and time into a single idea. We all exist in this continuum, whether we are aware of it or not, and every photo captured will relate to it.

Don’t let me over-complicate things, though. Understanding that a photo is taken in a certain place and at a certain time is easy enough to grasp. That in itself will have some historical value, but the space-time continuum has far wider implications on how a photograph is perceived.

Space, for instance, as a primary consideration, goes to what you point your camera at, your choice of subject. You need to be in the same space as the subject you want to photograph in order to be able to photograph it. Maybe one day you will be able to capture images formed in your mind without having to direct a camera towards a physical object. However, as I see it, it would no longer be a photograph.

Therefore, you need to pick a space that coincides with the subject you want to photograph. Furthermore, once you have decided on what you want to photograph you also have to decide how you want to frame it. This is clearly space related, too. Which point-of-view you decide on will have a huge impact on how your story in the photo is told. Then finally, you have to decide how you want this stage to be built. What do you leave out and what do you keep in? All these considerations are related to an understanding of space.

Time, on the other hand, is a variable that has other implications on a photograph. First of all, you need to consider when you want to take a photograph. Traditionally, most photographers know that taking a landscape photograph when the sun sits low on the horizon creates a very different result than a photograph of the same landscape taken at midday when the sun is in zenith. Time has also to do with your choice of moment, when to push the shutter release. In a landscape photograph just mentioned, the exact moment will not be as critical as when you a shooting some sport event in which a fraction of a second between two photos can make a big difference in the end result. Finally, time is also a cause for consideration as to what shutter speed you want use to render your idea of the subject. This later time factor is of course a little more technically depended, as you will have to choose a shutter speed that the camera lets you use.

Being consciously aware of space and time will make you a better photographer. The good part of learning to navigate them? You will never have to relearn how to use them if you want at some point to change your camera, because these factors—which have a huge impact on the visual expression—are complete camera independent.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Canon EOS-5D and a 24/105 mm lens set at 24 mm. Shutter speed: 1/200 of a second. Aperture: f/5.6. The photo was processed in Lightroom and Photoshop.

Posted in Creativity, Photographic Reflections, Photography, Properties of Photography, Travel Photography | Tagged , , , , | 45 Comments

Last Week’s Instagram

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Once a week—or every so often—I will display one of my photos captured and/or processed with Instagram over the last week (this photo is actually more than a week old, but I haven’t posted any new material the last week). It’s a way for me to show photography that usually is quite different from my regular work. Except for the technical details beneath the pictures are displayed without any comments, hoping they will stand on their own. But I still very much appreciate any comments you may have.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Panasonic Lumix LX-100 with the lens set at 10.9 mm (the equivalent of a 24 mm for a full frame camera). Shutter speed: 1/125 of a second. Aperture: f/13. The photo was transferred to my cell phone and then processed with the Snapseed app and its Drama filter.

Posted in Personal Work, Photography | Tagged | 41 Comments

A Delicate Balance

A photo without emotional content is a dead photo

A photo without emotional content is a dead photo

No photo truly succeeds unless it triggers strong emotions. The same holds true for all visual arts. However, photography is special in that its very creation is very much technically depended. So much in fact, that many photographers don’t venture beyond the technicalities of the photographic process. It might even be what draws them to photography in the first place. A technical perfect image is for them an absolute requirement. With this approach they miss the point, though, which is that a captivating photo needs more than technical perfection, it needs the emotional connection more than anything.

Photographs that we find most meaningful are those that ooze human endeavour and symbolize the meaning of our world and our lives. Images that hold the most power for us tend to focus on loved ones, those who inspire us, those we detest, tragedy and beauty. Whether they are completely sharp, properly exposed or perfectly composed is of less importance. Of course, we use those technical variables to tell the story as best as possible—as part of the visual language, but in and of themselves they are completely uninteresting. An emotionally loaded but technically poor photo trumps a technically perfect photo lacking emotional content—any time.

The fact that the photographic process is so technically depended can get in the way of creating those strong images we all aspire to capture. This goes even for those of us who are less attached to the technical side of things.

Because photography is such a technically depended art, at least some technical considerations are always needed before taking the photo. The way our brain works makes this a problem. If you have to focus your attention too much on the settings of the camera, you may not be able to connect with and capture the emotional content that triggered you to wanting to take the photo in the first place.

Let me use an illustration to make this clearer. One of the most famous illustrations shown in psychology books appears to be either a vase or a pair of faces in profile (see beneath). A person not familiar with the illusion sees only one aspect at first. When the other aspect is seen, the first one disappears. Though it becomes ever easier to go back and forth between the two apparent realities, no amount of familiarity will allow both subject to be seen at the same time.

Exactly the same process is at work when we try to juggle between the technical aspect and the emotional aspect of taking a photo.

When our attention is drawn to technical aspects, we disconnect from the emotional content as surely as we stop seeing the vase just as we see the face. As we begin to see a subject in terms of shutter speed, depth of field, light and other technical considerations, our brains shifts gear. We lose the emotional power of the process in that instance. We lose the ability to see and capture the emotional content.

That is why the technical handling of the camera must become instinctively. Given, this doesn’t come by itself. It’s something that will only happen after long practise. The more you photograph the less you need consciously be aware of how to capture a subject that has triggered your curiosity. At that point, you are better able to connect emotionally to whatever you are photographing, and make this radiate through the final image.

This goes back to the fourth stage of learning, what I called unconscious competence in the post The Rollercoaster of Learning here on my blog last November. At this stage, you are at a point where the tools in your hand no longer get in your way.

Imaging you are a writer—or maybe you even are one. If you had to search out every single letter on the keyboard when writing, it’s not hard to imaging what that would do to your flow of writing. Only when you don’t need to think about where you fingers go on the keyboard can you write fluently, right out of your mind. Only then will you be able to enter the state of being in flow.

So it’s is with photography. When you need to concentrate your mind with technical considerations you won’t be able to enter the flow. Your camera literally gets in the way.

Let me end this post with a quote by the great, now diseased, photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson: «Thinking should be done beforehand and afterwards – never while actually taking a photograph». He knew that thinking about technical aspect would pull us off from what is most important in the actual moment of capturing a photo.

En klassisk illusjon som ofte brukes i psykologi-bøker

On quite a different note: Last month I announced I would admit one person free of charge to my online workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice» starting up at the end of May. Quite a few people signed up for the draw, which has now been carried out. However, instead of drawing one, I decided to admit two of those who sign up for the draw, to the workshop. The winners of the draw are: Ann-Christine Påhlson and Colleen Briggs.

Facts about the photo: The photo was taken with a Canon EOS-5D and a 16-35 mm lens set at 16 mm. Shutter speed: 1/250 of a second. Aperture: f/13. The photo was processed in Lightroom and Photoshop with the plug-in Nik Silver Efex Pro for black and white conversion.

Posted in Creativity, Photographic Reflections, Photography | Tagged , , , | 69 Comments