A Bit of Normalcy

Last week I had a touch of what some normalcy tastes like. I did my first travel since the world locked down one and a half years ago. Of course, it wasn’t totally back to the good old days. Still, on airports and when flying one has to wear a mask – and when arriving to a country there were covid-19 controls.

Nevertheless, I could travel! Which almost felt a little strange but most of all joyous. Just sitting back and feel the airplane taking off for a new destination was exhilarating, despite the pestilence of having to wear a mask. And then arriving. Touching down in a new place!

Nevertheless, for me the absolute best was finally being able to meet my love one after one and a half years of forced separation. In fact, that’s why Iceland became our first travel destination since the lockdown. It’s one of the only countries that would accept us both, without quarantine as long as you are vaccinated.

I have been to Iceland before, but it was back in the 1980’s, so it’s been a few years. Of course, generally the landscape doesn’t changed much over a few decades, although Iceland is one of few countries in which landscape changes do happen every so often, whenever a volcano erupts. In fact, this year saw a new eruption just south of the capital Reykjavik. Fagradalsfjall volcano erupted in March. After the first eruption, it’s been more of a low flowing river of lava, covering the valley of Fagradal and slowly moving towards the sea.

On the photo, I am overlooking Fagradalsfjall with the crater to the right. Not every day is it possible to see glowing lava, but it’s steadily creating new land. Nevertheless, it was a impressive experience to view.

I will get back with more photos from my trip to Iceland. However, I first need to edit and process the photos I captured. For now, though, I will take the rest of July off from blogging, but I’ll be back in August. Enjoy the summer (or winter if you are in the southern hemisphere). See you again in August.

Natural Light Indoor

Nothing beats natural light. It’s versatile, always changing like a facet, thus always surprising and so beautiful. Even in places, you recon you would need to use artificial light; you may take advantage of natural light. Think indoor. Your first thought may be to turn on the flash, but instead of its harsh and contrasting result, here is a different approach.

If you are interested in this practical tip, you will find more about it on Blue Hour Photo Workshop’s blog.

Capturing the Atmosphere in Night Photos

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One of the changes coming with my «new» blog this year will be a complete new layout. This is still work in progress. However in addition, throughout the year, I will add new features to my blog, and today I introduce one of them.

Every so often, I will publish practical tips about how to get better photos. This blog, though, is mostly about creativity and although it’s based on my approach to photography I hope it have relevance to other creative disciplines as well. Thus, very concrete tips on shooting don’t really belong here. Instead, I will post them on the educational blog for Blue Hour Photo Workshops and only make a reference with a link here on In Flow.

This is the first tip I will present this way:

When you want to capture photos in the night, there is in particular one thing you should be aware of. Obviously everything is going to be darker and thus you would most likely need to use a tripod or at least amp up the ISO-setting significantly. Otherwise, the captured photo will be very blurry—which of course can be used creatively if that’s your intention.

However, what I really have in mind is quite something different. Look up this super advise for better night photos.

On a different note: As announced a couple of times I will draw a winner who will be able to participate in my online photo workshop «Finding Your Photographic Voice» later in May. The deadline is now passed and the drawing will take place later this week. The winner will be announced in my blog post on Monday.

Holiday in Honduras









Lush rain forest; colourful coral reefs; wild rivers; spectacular mountains; white, soft and sandy beaches; ancient Maya ruins; proud descendents of the old cultures; beautiful colonial towns and friendly people all over. That is pretty much Honduras summed up. And yes, mosquitoes – not to forget.

Spending the Holidays in Honduras was simply great – as you can understand. I have travelled extensively in Latin American countries before, but hardly ever have I been so positively taken aback as in Honduras. I usually resent travel stories that talk about the friendly people in the visited country, simply because I find most people to be friendly no matter where you go. But Hondurans were – or are – special, at least that’s how I experienced it. Everywhere we went, we were met with openness, hospitality and curiosity such that I have never found anywhere else. I think one reason is that Honduras has hardly developed any tourist industry – yet, and with the exception of the Bay Islands along the Caribbean coastline and Copan – the old Maya site, which is the biggest tourist attraction in the country.

For anyone interested in exploring Latin America, I would highly recommend Honduras. We spent two weeks in the lovely country, but could easily have spent another month there. I definitely feel like I need to come back again.

Above are a handful of pictures from the trip. This was not a photo assignment, but a pure holiday. That limits the time and effort I put into photography, if nothing else to not become completely antisocial with those I travel with. In addition this became a very active holiday. We did all kinds of physical activities; diving, kayaking, hiking, snorkelling, river rafting and swimming. Nevertheless – and needless to say – I still do take a lot of pictures wherever I go and whatever I do. But these photographs are more snapshots and occasional travel photos.

While at it, I would use the opportunity to extend an apologue to all of you who have followed my blog and commented the various posts the last couple of weeks. While travelling in Honduras I simply did not have time enough to give feedback or follow up on your own blogs. I did read all your encouraging comments, though, since they are forwarded to my email, but on the road I had no chance to read all your own fantastic postings. For me giving positive feedback is what the blog sphere is very much about. But I promise the next couple of weeks I will do my best to catch up with every one of you. Thanks for the patience and for keep following my blog.