Spectacular Concert

Earlier this summer, I attended one of the most stunning concerts I have ever been present at. It was the British band Muse during their Simulation Theory World Tour. The concert was like a firework of music, lights and showmanship. As a matter of fact, I never seen a stage show anything close to this. Spectacular is the only word I can conceive of that even closely covers what happened up on the stage.

Besides the show, the music itself set everyone on fire from the first song. It was loud. It was intense. It was brilliant. It was catching. I guess the music of Muse is not necessarily for everyone. That said, for a long time I have been a big fan. The concert certainly didn’t change that.

Muse is one of the biggest bands in the world, presently. I watched them play in Lisbon. The Simulation Theory World Tour took place on a main stage, two stage wings and a long catwalk that the band members enjoyed venturing out on, in particular Matt Bellamy, the lead vocal and guitar player.

Behind the stage there was a large LED screen displaying captivating and explosive visuals. Towards the end of the show, a large inflatable puppet skeleton, similar to ones seen in the music video for “The Dark Side”, appeared towering over the stage. The show also featured 14 dancers performing in spectacular outfits and doing amazing acrobatics.

These are but a few of the photos from the concert.

Creating more Creativity


Trying to be creative is sometimes very frustrating. Sometimes it is as if the muses have died out completely, while we sit there waiting for some inspiration. In articular, it can be hard to get in touch with our creative self if we have been neglecting it for some time. It goes into hiding if you don’t massage it on a regular basis and keep it awake. If we leave the creative self hanging out to dry for even shorter periods—even if we have years of experience in the creative field behind us—it gets back on us but short circuiting the creative connection. The muses die out on us.

The reality is that nothing encourages and develops creativity more than creating—being creative. It doesn’t matter what field you are exploring creatively, be it photography, writing, painting, design, performances, music or any other creative activity. Whatever we do, we need to keep doing it on a regular basis. If we want to develop our creative skills, become better and more profound in what we do, we need to keep creating—all the time. And we need to work creatively even when the result is mediocre and not what we want it to be. If we stop and just wait for inspiration to come, we only stagnate even more. Even more so, when we feel we have lost the inspiration—that’s when you have to push yourself through the wall of self-doubt and discouragement. Make mediocre art if that’s what comes out of your creative self. And don’t worry about it—and certainly don’t whip yourself for it. It’s only a temporary state, anyway. At some point the muses kick in again, and you become inspired and your creative skills start developing again. It’s like playing on the beach. As soon as you start, it’s hard to stop.

Being creative encourages creativity. That’s why I have made it a rule for myself to do at least one personal photo shoot or project each week (I am a photographer after all!). I usually shoot much more, being assigned to do so. And that’s adding to the creative equation, too. But I want to make sure I develop my personal photography as well, and once a week is what I can spare of my time during busy weeks, and when it’s less busy, it still forces me to go out and be creative. It’s been a good way to keep my creative spirit going—and developing.

How do you keep developing your creative skills and staying inspired?

Creating more Creativity


Trying to be creative is sometimes very frustrating. It’s as if the muse has died out completely, while we sit there waiting for some inspiration. Particularly can it be hard to get in touch with our creative self if we have been neglecting it for some time. It goes into hiding if you don’t massage it on a regular basis and keep it awake. If we leave the creative self hanging out to dry for even shorter periods – even if we have years of experience in the creative field behind us – it gets back to us but short circuiting the creative connection. The muse dies out on us.

The fact is that nothing encourages and develops creativity more than creating – being creative. It doesn’t matter what field you are exploring creatively, be it photography, writing, painting, design, performances, music or any other creative activity. Whatever we do, we need to keep doing it on a regular basis. If we want to develop our creative skills, become better and more profound in what we do, we need to keep creating – all the time. And we need to work creatively even when the result is mediocre and not what we want it to be. If we stop and just wait for inspiration to come, we only stagnate even more. Instead that’s when you have to push yourself through the wall of self-doubt and discouragement. Make mediocre art if that’s what comes out of your creative self. It’s only a temporary state, anyway. At some point the muse kicks in again, and you become inspired and your creative skills start developing again. It’s like playing on the beach. As soon as you start, it’s hard to stop.

Being creative encourages creativity. That’s why I have made it a rule for myself to do at least one personal photo shoot or project each week (I am a photographer after all!). I usually shoot much more, being assigned to do so. And that’s adding to the creative equation, too. But I want to make sure I develop my personal photography as well, and once a week is what I can spare of my time during busy weeks, and when it’s less busy, it still forces me to go out and be creative. It’s been a good way to keep my creative spirit going – and developing.

How do you keep developing your creative skills and staying inspired?