Streets of Rome

Rome is a fascinating city. Just thinking about its thousands of years of history can spellbound any person. The history is evident all over the city, in ruins, in incomparable buildings all from the earliest periods up until today, and not the least in the Roman culture and attitude.

The latter was what I was trying to capture during the photo workshop lead by the Swedish photographer Martin Bogren, I attended two weeks ago. I roamed the streets away from where the tourists the usual ramble. Photographing regular Romans of today—in their many shapes and appearances. It was actually so pleasant to not have to visit any of the big attractions, but rather experience the “real” Rome.

Here are a few last images I will post from my very rewarding trip to Rome.

72 thoughts on “Streets of Rome

  1. Hi Otto, What an exciting group of portraits that capture the spirit of the people. Your post-processing is fantastic as are your compositions and close proximity to your subjects. Terrific and inspiring work.

  2. Beautiful work, Otto. Taking “up close” photos is something that I have never been very comfortable with, but you have certainly mastered it.

  3. I’m not really into street photography, but I have to say this is the strongest set you’ve shown us from that trip so far. Interesting post processing too.

  4. I am glad you enjoyed capturing some of the lesser-known faces of Rome, Otto. Just out of interest-is it customary to obtain people’s consent before taking their portrait, or does one try to catch them unawares? It is interesting how our behaviors and expressions change when we know that someone is photographing them.

    1. There is no “rule” as such for how to approach photographing people on the street. But two approaches – at least. One is to be the fly on the wall, observing and photographing without connecting with people – which means not asking for consent. The other is establishing a connection and use that connection to create images. Naturally then, there will be a consent – or not, in which case there won’t be any photographs. As you indicate, the two approaches give quite different results.

      1. That’s what I thought, Otto. Even though I find people’s faces and expressions fascinating, I feel slightly voyeuristic if I capture them on film, which might be why I take photos of floral and feathered faces. 🙂

  5. Like the others you posted, these are just, well, there are no words. They are so good! There is so much emotion and life, and at the same time, there is a keen aesthetic at work. Again, I’m happy for you and I thank you for sharing this experience.

  6. Another very powerful collection. It was clearly a very stimulating workshop.’ I am very aware of a sculptural quality in several of these images which intensifies the impact, for me.

  7. I’m not even sure what words to use to best describe these stunning photos, Otto. They’re really stunning! I don’t know how to speak of the lighting and dramatic effects. I don’t have the best photography vocabulary, but I just have to tell you how much I admire your talent, and I think the images are fabulous, Otto! Really special!

  8. I love these images!!! They all seem like you could reach out and touch them. They are alive! Real. The textures are incredible. My favourite is the 3rd one of the 2 men. I can almost feel their bristley beards.

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